The Sagamore

Review: Pippin

The+cast+of+Pippin+poses+after+the+opening+hit+song%2C+%22Magic+to+Do.%22
The cast of Pippin poses after the opening hit song,

The cast of Pippin poses after the opening hit song, "Magic to Do."

AMANDA KRAVITZ/SAGAMORE STAFF

AMANDA KRAVITZ/SAGAMORE STAFF

The cast of Pippin poses after the opening hit song, "Magic to Do."

Amanda Kravitz, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






A young boy is sleeping in the middle of the stage as voices begin to echo, “Pippin, everything you have been looking for” and “you are not very smart, Pippin.” I was curious if this was a dream or real life as the narrators appeared on stage to set the scene of this year’s musical.

As medieval characters begin to dance, Pippin, directed and choreographed by dance teacher Christien Polos, introduces Pippin’s conflicting quest for happiness and living up to society’s expectations.

The story begins with the arrival of an ensemble of circus-like characters on stage. Pippin (junior Diego Echeverria De Cordova), a young man, craves adventure and meaning in his life. His father, the distracted king Charles (sophomore Tristan Conaway), does not respect Pippin as much as he respects Pippin’s stepbrother (senior Hunter Amory). Pippin is eventually convinced by these performers that killing his father will fully satisfy him in life. Along the way, Pippin falls for a beautiful, young woman named Catherine (senior Felicia Rosen), which results in a tough choice for Pippin in the end: Should he settle down with Catherine in a peaceful village, or should he continue to be controlled by this magical group of performers and let society win?

AMANDA KRAVITZ/SAGAMORE STAFF
Junior Diego Echeverria De Cordova plays Pippin, who contemplates whether to give in to society or continue his quest for happiness, in this year’s musical, “Pippin.”

A memorable moment from the second scene starts off with a dark blue background and only a spotlight on Pippin. As the lights get brighter, the stage becomes lined with the medieval ensemble and the two Lead Players (juniors Ranna Shabazi and Zach Lowenstein). Pippin exclaims, “Why do I feel I don’t fit in anywhere I go?” The spotlight follows Pippin as he struts across stage, pausing by different people and using his hands to point to the sky. When the music fades, we are able to see a softer side of Pippin. His simple, white costume stands out among the other extravagant, brightly colored costumes, exemplifying the difference between reality and fantasy.

A powerful moment arrives later in the first act, when Pippin goes to war. The stage turns from a blue to a deep, dark red tone. Soldiers fight with shiny, sharp swords while dancers run across. The music turns from soft beats to fast and loud ones. All of sudden, the music gets softer and Pippin is on his knees among the dead bodies with his two hands in the air; they are drenched in blood.

AMANDA KRAVITZ/SAGAMORE STAFF
King Charles, played by sophomore Tristan Conaway, surveys the aftermath of a battle in “Pippin.”

Pippin kills his father after he realizes that he does not have what it takes to be a soldier in the war. It is clear from the shock and fear in his face that he does not have the heart to fight. Pippin was unsure if killing his father would help satisfy him. He is always searching for better things in life, and in this incident, he loses sight of his own values.

AMANDA KRAVITZ/SAGAMORE STAFF
The cast of “Pippin” prepares to bow at the conclusion of the musical.

Overall, it is evident that Pippin faces many challenges over the course of the musical. However, the main message is that if you continue searching for happiness, you will never be fully satisfied and you will continue to suppress your morals and go against what you truly believe in. It takes Pippin multiple times for him to finally realize that he loves Catherine and it is not worth losing her for something else.

Catch the musical Pippin on Friday, Feb. 9 and Saturday, Feb. 10 at 7:30. Admission $5.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” mirrors modern day issues

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Movie Review: Sierra Burgess is a Loser

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Halloween Costumes 2018

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    “Bohemian Rhapsody” movie delves deep into Queen’s intricacies

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Company One uses theater as a vehicle for change

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Wave of Asian representation in film fights stigma

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Poet provides an eye-opening experience for the high school

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    “Mid90s” movie delights universally with its unique message

  • Review: Pippin

    Arts

    Emily Lew combines art and activism in AP Portfolio

  • Arts

    Z-block performing arts classes provide rewarding start to day

Navigate Right
The student news site of Brookline High School
Review: Pippin